SFF Project Summary

Project Title: Indigenous Forestry a comprehensive approach to providing information to the widest possible audience
Grant No.: 04/150
   

Contact Details

Name of Applicant Group: Tane's Tree Trust
Contact Person: Ian Barton
Address: PO Box 12094
Hamilton 3248
Telephone 1: 09 239 2049
Telephone 2:
Facsimile: 09 239 2049
Email: ibtrees@wc.net.nz

Project Details

Status: finished
SFF Funding: 136,000
Total Project Funding: 260,500
Proposed Start Date: 2004-07
Proposed Finish Date: 2007-06
Region: National
Sector: Forestry
Sub-sector: Farm forestry
Topic: Information transfer
Alternative land use
Land development opportunities
Decision management and support


Updated: 09 March 2009

Website: www.tanestrees.org.nz

Final report

Main outputs from the project:

Newsletters:

Project Description:

The project is divided into several sections although all have the ultimate objective of improving the flow of information about planted indigenous forest to any person involved in its practice. The sections are: -

Workshops are being run over the whole country to introduce people to the topic and present the latest information on growing native trees.

Early research information, which is scattered around the country is being located and key information entered on to a database which when complete will be widely available.

A Manual on Continuous Cover Forestry is being written. This will cover the history and principles of CCF as well as containing practical information for the grower.

The proceedings of “Profiting from Biodiversity” seminars, which dealt with the taxation and resource management issues associated with growing native trees for timber, are to be published with funding assistance from SFF.

Preliminary work on the setting up of an interactive information and database system, to enable the recording of native tree plantations and trials.

The Issue/Opportunity:

All of the above aspects of the project reflect a rapidly increasing interest in the growing of native tree species for timber. This requires the provision of readily available information, good record keeping systems and actions to make external impacts like taxation less prohibitive.

Context/Background:

The project is important because the information that people need in order to establish and manage their own forests is at best scattered and at worst not available in usable form. The Trust’s objectives illustrate the requirements.

Methods

Most of the methods are mentioned in the above. The Trust has set up a network of stakeholders which include individual land owners, scientists, foresters, Regional and Local Councils and government employees. To these stakeholders and the wider public we will disseminate information by means of workshops, publications, through our website and newsletter to network members and by the provision of databases to enable rapid search and retrieval of information.

Latest Update: March 2007

Of the 18 workshops scheduled only one remains to be done (Gisborne 6 May). The workshops have been very successful with an average attendance of 55 to date. The Trust proposes to continue providing workshops in the future but with a revised presentation.

Approval was sought from the SFF to print and distribute the proceedings of two workshops run in 2003 which dealt with the taxation and RMA impediments to the planting of native trees for timber. Entitled “Profiting from Biodiversity: Reducing the impediments to planting native trees”, these have been distributed to all members of Tāne’s Tree Trust, sent to all District and Regional Councils and made available at all Trust workshops. Copies are available from Ian Barton at ibtrees@wc.net.nz; 09 239 2049 or writing to PO Box 1169, Pukekohe.

A major project has been to locate and enter on to a database details of research done on indigenous forestry (Archives) and often, for various reasons, not completed. Location of the data is virtually complete and most has now been entered on to the database by the people involved. Unfortunately, although we were led to believe that there was a quantity of data held privately, virtually none has been located, despite wide-spread advertising. The data complied by various researchers have now to be combined and edited before being made available to all who want copies. At this stage it is not proposed to make printed copies available but it is hoped that the database will be available for access through the Trust’s website. The ability to add new material when it is located will also be provided.

Progress with the manual on Continuous Cover Forestry (CCF) has been slower than wished. Part of this is due to lack of time and part to the somewhat unexpected amount of work required -especially the field work to determine suitable monitoring/ inventory processes. While the final draft is expected to be complete by mid April, the ensuing editorial processes and any required re-writes mean that it is unlikely that the manual will be available until after August.


Quarterly Update: June 2006

Indigenous Forest Establishment workshops were held at Pureora and Kaitaia during May. These were attended by between 40 and 50 at each. The very successful Pureora workshop was run jointly with Nga Whenua Rahui and was with a group of several iwi representatives. Further workshops are being planned for Otorohanga and Taupo. Contact Peter Berg at p.berg@pentarch.biz; telephone 09 309 5049 or by writing to PO Box 1169, Pukekohe.

The questionnaires completed at each workshop provide very useful feedback with 78% of the attendees finding them either excellent or very good.

Copies of the proceedings of the 2003 seminars on the taxation and Resource Management Act impacts on planted indigenous forests are still available. Free copies can be obtained by contacting Peter Berg as above or writing to PO Box 1169, Pukekohe.

The Retrieval and Promulgation of Indigenous Forestry Research Information part of the project is well advanced. We are still seeking to contact people who previously worked for the Forest Service in order to locate missing research data.

Work on the Continuous Cover Forestry manual is continuing with revision of the original draft about 80% complete.


March 2006

Indigenous Forest Establishment workshops were held at Blenheim and Richmond during March. These were well attended by between 60 and 70 at each. The programme for further workshops is now being prepared and the Trust would be pleased to hear from any organizations which would like a workshop in their area. Contacting Ian Barton at ibtrees@wc.net.nz; 09 239 2049, or writing to PO Box 1169, Pukekohe.

Questionnaires are completed at each workshop. So far 71% of the attendees have found the workshops either excellent or very good. People seem to be prepared to travel considerable distances to these presentations – 47% would go more than 100 km and a further 29% more than 50 km. Improvements to the presentations are being requested by having more local content, more discussion and better handouts. The biggest problem with this is that there is only so much that can be crammed into one day and, unless the programme is extended into the evening or the next day, these are expectations which are difficult to meet. Of the general comments the most common relate to the current lack of indigenous forest research and information on the marketing of indigenous timbers.

The proceedings of the 2003 seminars on the taxation and Resource Management Act impacts on planted indigenous forests continue to be circulated and are now going out to members of the legal profession. Free copies are available to anyone who is interested by contacting Ian Barton at ibtrees@wc.net.nz; 09 239 2049 or writing to PO Box 1169, Pukekohe.

The Retrieval and Promulgation of Indigenous Forestry Research Information part of the project, is well advanced. Searching of the National Archives is complete with a small amount of work still to be done with the Forest Research Archives. We are still seeking to contact people who previously worked for the Forest Service in order to locate missing research data.

Work on the Continuous Cover Forestry manual is continuing with revision of the original draft about 50% complete.


December 2005

Two more Indigenous Forest Establishment workshops were held at Masterton and Marton during November. These were well attended by between 50 and 70 at each. The programme for a further nine workshops is now being prepared and the Trust would be pleased to hear from any organizations which would like a workshop in their area.

Questionnaires are completed at each workshop. So far 77% of the attendees have found the workshops either excellent or very good. People seem to be prepared to travel considerable distances to these presentations – 47% would go more than 100 km and a further 30% more than 50 km. Improvements to the presentations were sought by having more local content, more discussion and better handouts. The biggest problem with this is that there is only so much that can be crammed into one day and, unless the programme is extended into the evening or the next day, these are expectations which are difficult to meet. Of the general comments the most common relate to the current lack of indigenous forest research and information on the marketing of indigenous timbers.

The proceedings of the 2003 seminars on the taxation and Resource Management Act impacts on planted indigenous forests have now been printed and copies sent to all Trust network members and all Councils. Free copies are available to anyone who is interested by contacting Ian Barton at ibtrees@wc.net.nz; 09 239 2049 or writing to PO Box 1169, Pukekohe.

The Retrieval and Promulgation of Indigenous Forestry Research Information part of the project, is well advanced with almost all National Archives having been searched, further work with the Forest Research Archives is proposed as are searches of some smaller archives held by libraries etc. Data entry is well advanced but checking and correcting is still to be done.

Work on the Continuous Cover Forestry manual is held up by lack of time although field work on case studies is being done. It is hoped to complete the re-writing of the draft manual over the next six months.


September 2005

Publication of Continuous Cover Forestry Manual

Field work for case study forests has continued.

Retrieval and Promulgation of Indigenous Forestry Research Information

Most searching at Forest Research Rotorua completed. Searching has begun on files at the Auckland office of Archives New Zealand. Work at other archives is due to start before Christmas. Most Forest Research date has been entered into the data base. Advertisements are being run in a range of scientific and popular Journals and newsletters seeking details of privately held data.

Indigenous Forest Establishment Workshops

No workshops held this quarter. Planning is well advanced for two, in Masterton and Marton, to be held in November. In March next year there will be two more in Nelson and Marlborough. We are considering holding a workshop / conference next July, in conjunction with our A.G.M. This will be in Taupo and will emphasis the role of native forests in improving water purity

Profiting from Biodiversity:

Proceedings of the 2003 seminars on the taxation and Resource Management Act impacts on planted indigenous forests are now with the printer. The publication should be available early in November.


June 2005

Most effort this quarter has gone into the running of three Indigenous Forest Establishment workshops held in the South Island during May. These were at Gore, Rangiora and Geraldine. We ran into some problems with the organization of workshops at long distance but, because we had excellent support from local people (mainly Institute of Forestry and Farm Forestry members) everything fell into place. The Trust was very pleased with the attendance at the workshops, which averaged 60 and by the enthusiastic reception.

We asked attendees to complete a questionnaire at each workshop. 84% found the workshops either excellent or very good. The most obvious fault was the lack of South Island expertise in the presentations. This aspect the Trust had tried hard to eliminate before the workshops but unfortunately we could not find any Southerners willing to talk about beech and rimu. Consequently Northerners had to cover these subjects. It is interesting to note just how far people will travel to these presentations – half would go more than 100 km. One of the commonest of the general comments related to the current lack of indigenous forest research.

Planning continues for workshops to be held in Wairarapa /Rangitikie and Nelson / Marlborough. The first two will probably be late October/ November.

The proceedings of the 2003 seminars on the taxation and Resource Management Act impacts on planted indigenous forests are currently being edited and should be going to the printer very soon. They will be available as a Tane’s Tree Trust publication later this year.

With the Retrieval and Promulgation of Indigenous Forestry Research Information part of the project, Tony Beveridge has about 80% completed locating and indexing files at Forest Research Rotorua, and has begun searching files at the Auckland office of Archives New Zealand.